How to get back to work or school after cancer ?

Comment revenir au travail ou aux études après un cancer ?

Consisting of oncology nurses and librarians, the team Info-cancer of the Fondation québécoise du cancer, attempts to answer some of the key questions posed by young people who have to resume an active life after cancer

January 18, 2020 15: 49

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How to get back to work or school after cancer ?

Jean-Benoit Legault

The canadian Press

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MONTREAL — A new thematic dossier published by the Fondation québécoise du cancer gives some tracks for adolescents and young adults who must return to school or work after a long absence due to illness.

The folder “Back to work or school” is the sixth to be put online on the portal of the Program to Felix, cancer15-39.com. The other deal with issues such as sexuality, pregnancy, parenting, and emotions.

“In the Portal to Felix, in general, we look to provide the most information possible to young people who are suffering from cancer, and the aspect of returning to work, back to school often comes up,’ explained Anne-Marie Drolet, who is a technician in documentation at the Fondation québécoise du cancer. Of course, these are young people who are early in their career, or studies, who live full of difficulties and challenges. Then that folder back to school or to work is really something that is important in their eyes.”

Consisting of oncology nurses and librarians, the team Info-cancer of the Fondation québécoise du cancer, attempts to answer some of the key questions posed by young people who have to resume an active life after an experience that will certainly have completely messed up their existence.

The answers found there relate in particular to what they should (or should not) disclose to their colleagues or boss, the feeling of guilt that we can feel the need for a sick leave as young, the fatigue that often accompanies treatment and the support that you may need to resume the normal course of things.

Other answers will be added soon.

“It is general in the population that was diagnosed with cancer, everything is back to work, back to some normality, but this is particularly true among young adults, said Ms. Drolet. The scientific evidence also tended to emphasize this need-there among the youth, more training.”

A young man of 15 or 16 years of age may be required to revise his choice of career if his cognitive abilities or physical have been affected in the long term, or even if his way of perceiving themselves or their identity had been changed. For an adult, it may be financial issues or professional: some will have to come back with their parents, others will ask how to explain this “hole” in their curriculum vitae.

“Sometimes the discomfort. Sometimes a sense of guilt. A nervousness. The fear of not being able to perform the work that we did before, the fear of being judged by colleagues, summarized Ms. Drolet. For many it is the creator of anxiety, hence the importance of preparing the return as possible.”

General rule, therefore, young and old, feel ill-equipped when the time comes to resume their lives after their treatment.

“The return to normality when life has changed, the way to readjust, to get back in touch in the company’s performance, it really is something that is apparent,” said dr. Drolet. One has the impression, very very false, that at last treatment (against cancer) that is, it turns the page and it is finished. But it continues, and where it is least supported also by the health system. When these issues arise, absolutely.”

The portal of the Program to Felix, cancer15-39.com, has been created in 2016. More than 20 000 have consulted in 2019, of which a majority were between 25 and 34 years old. It is estimated that one Quebecer in two will face cancer.

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