Jean Charest is not a candidate for the leadership of the conservative Party

Jean Charest pas candidat à la direction du Parti conservateur

Jean Charest made the announcement of its withdrawal to the race to the leadership of the conservative Party of Canada on Tuesday in an interview that Radio-Canada was broadcast at 17h, but it was ahead of some of the elements as a result of conflicting information surrounding his candidacy.

January 21, 2020 14h41

Updated at 21h37

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Jean Charest is not a candidate for the leadership of the conservative Party

Pierre Saint-Arnaud

The Canadian Press

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Jean Charest will not be a candidate for the leadership of the conservative Party of Canada (CPC).

The ex-prime minister of Quebec and former leader of the leader of the progressive conservative Party of Canada made the announcement on Tuesday during an interview that Radio-Canada was broadcast at 17h, but it was ahead of some of the elements as a result of conflicting information surrounding his candidacy.

Jean Charest himself has released a statement thereafter to confirm his intentions.

In this statement, he explains that his thinking, which began in the wake of calls “numerous and insistent to the size of the country (which he is) bears a candidate for the leadership of the conservative Party”, led him to not run for the leadership.

Mr. Charest said worry “strongly that the canadian population is politically divided”, and says that the country “is in need of an alternative national policy” to represent all regions of Canada.

A party different from his own

The first chief, it is said to believe that the CCP will have to introduce environmental matters, “a credible and ambitious management of our natural resources and the fight against climate change”, thereby implying that his old training had not.

He adds, in passing, that his positions on many issues of society “are based on deep convictions,” and that “it is clear that the conservative Party of Canada has been profoundly transformed” since his departure in 1998.

The conservative Party today is certainly far different from the one he had left at that time.

After the humiliating defeat in 1993, when the conservatives had to elect two deputies, and then the defeat at the 1997 election where, under his leadership, the party did was to elect 20 members of parliament, the party merged with the Reform Party, renamed the canadian Alliance in 2003. Hitherto conducted by moderate conservatives, the progressive conservative Party has dropped the word “progressive” and made a right turn under the influence of the Alliance, led by Stephen Harper.

Rules adverse

Beyond the ideological divide, Jean Charest said that “the rules of the leadership race do not favour a candidate of the external, all the more that the timeline is very tight,” and he had “a happy family life as well as a very active professional life” at a major Montreal law firm.

A survey of Light directed to The canadian Press on January 8, last (1) comes, however, throw a different light on strategic considerations : the survey placed the ex-minister Rona Ambrose in the first rank of the support of Canadians to potential candidates for the leadership of the conservative Party, followed by the ex-minister Peter MacKay, with premier Jean Charest far behind the duo.

The first – which leaves room for the suspense over its possible candidate obtained the support of 18 % of the respondents versus 12% for Peter MacKay, who confirmed his participation last week on the social networks. Jean Charest, for his part, garnered only 4 % support in Canada, although it was good at first in Quebec.

Gold, Peter MacKay is also resulting from the branch’s progressive conservative Party, those that are nicknamed the “red torys”, and it has the potential to go and seek out the support of many activists who could be tempted by a turn progressive would be the accession of a Jean Charest in the direction.

The shadow of Mâchurer

In addition, it was submitted, Jean Charest would have found it hard to distance themselves from the numerous police investigations surrounding the financing of the Quebec liberal Party.

Although he has never been accused of anything, his name is associated with the survey Mâchurer of the Unité permanente anti-corruption, investigation that is not complete.

Last week, the media have finally been able to disseminate written statements in support of the search warrants to businesses of Marc Bibeau, ex-grand treasurer of the liberal Party of Quebec and a friend of Jean Charest. Mr. Charest has never denied his friendship with Marc Bibeau, but that he has nothing to hide in this folder.

However, as the UPAC will not have completed its work and decided whether charges will be brought or not, the shadow of the investigation Mâchurer hover above the head of the ex-premier Charest, in connection with the financing of the QLP.

The conservatives will elect their new leader June 27 at a leadership convention in Toronto.

(1) The survey was conducted from 1554 Canadians between 3 and 7 January in line and there was no margin of error due to the sample non-probabilistic.

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