Law 21: the groups are asking the supreme Court to hear an appeal

Loi 21: des groupes demandent à la Cour suprême d’entendre un appel

The Law on the secularity of the State, known as act 21, prohibits employees of the State in a position of coercive authority, such as judges, police officers and prison guards from wearing religious symbols in the exercise of their functions.

December 18, 2019 21: 12

Share

Law 21: the groups are asking the supreme Court to hear an appeal

The canadian Press

Share

Groups challenging the law in québec on secularism have shown Wednesday, have asked the supreme Court of Canada to look at the recent decision of the Quebec Court of appeal.

The plaintiffs in the highly publicized case have stated Wednesday that they had sent an official correspondence to the highest court in the country.

The Quebec Court of appeal last week rejected the request of a national organization, a muslim, an advocacy group for civil liberties and a university student who wears the hijab to suspend the central elements of the law until the legal challenge is heard on the merits.

The Law on the secularity of the State, known as act 21, prohibits employees of the State in a position of coercive authority, such as judges, police officers and prison guards from wearing religious symbols in the exercise of their functions. This prohibition also extends to the teachers of the public network. The act also includes a provision for derogation to exclude certain articles of the charters of rights and freedoms, including the right to freedom of religion.

In a decision of two against one made the 12 December, the Court of appeal has recognized that the bill 21 to cause an injury that could be severe and irreparable, but it has indicated that the inclusion of the notwithstanding clause was so that she should not be suspended.

“We said to Quebecers and to Canadians that we do not arrêterions not our work as long as this unjust law will not have been defeated”, said in a press release Mustafa Farooq, director of the national Council of canadian muslims, one of the plaintiffs.

“Respectfully, we believe that there are errors of law in the decision of the majority [of the Court of appeal]. Therefore, we will do what we have promised. While teachers and other public sector employees are forced to leave their employment, we will ask for the permission of the supreme Court of Canada to put an end to the serious and irreparable harm caused by the act 21.”

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *