Leadership of the conservative Party: the web site of Bryan Brulotte riddled with mistakes of the French

Direction du Parti conservateur: le site web de Bryan Brulotte criblé de fautes de français

The web site of Bryan Brulotte, a business man who hopes to succeed Andrew Scheer, is riddled with mistakes in French and the translations dubious, has found The canadian Press.

January 6, 2020 13h58

Updated at 15h58

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Leadership of the conservative Party: the web site of Bryan Brulotte riddled with mistakes of the French

Catherine Lévesque

The canadian Press

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OTTAWA – The race to the leadership of the conservative Party of Canada is not officially started, already, the French is a rough ride.

The web site of Bryan Brulotte, a business man who hopes to succeed Andrew Scheer, is riddled with mistakes in French and the translations dubious, has found The canadian Press.

READ ALSO: Bryan Brulotte launches in the race for the succession of Andrew Scheer

On the home page, Mr. Brulotte is part of his “wants” (sic) to serve the country as a future leader of the conservatives.

Under the tab “Unit, and the Call to Serve” (“Unity and the Call to Serve” in English), it is stated that Mr. Brulotte “has taken everything that he had learned (sic) in the army to make the transition between military and civilian life”.

In a quote that is assigned to it, the candidate adds that “we all deserve a life full and meaningful, and we feel independent and valued, to be at our optimum”.

“It is up to us all to contribute to a country and their families more prosperous, secure, and strong,” reads another quote. The adjective “safe” is an anglicism from the English word “secure” and does not exist in French.

The advertising campaign in French newspapers has not been revised, since Mr. Brulotte announced his intention to stand as leader of the conservative Party “of” Canada in a half-page of the newspaper “The Duty”.

On Twitter, the main party has presented its “most sincere apologies to the place of our community of French-Canadian (sic)” for this “typo”.

However, this same typo is always found in his biography on his Twitter account Monday afternoon.

The 55-year-old, who grew up in Quebec, has wanted to launch his campaign quickly in order to take momentum early in the leadership race.

He has already published its programme entitled “A vision for Canada: a country for all”, in order to share their ideas on the plan of the economy, the environment, foreign policy and defence.

Mr. Brulotte announces his intention to preach federalism, decentralized, reduce taxes for everyone – even the wealthiest – and to build an oil pipeline in the eastern part of the country like the now defunct project Energy Is. It also decides against a price on carbon.

This document of 23 pages in French seems to have been revised, even though it contains a few shells.

The conservatives will choose their new leader June 27 in Toronto. The rules of the race have not been announced.

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