#MeToo 5 years later as seen by artists

#MeToo 5 ans plus seen by artists

Who better than artists to witness the changes in the industry since the first wave of #MeToo, in 2017? Public figures have agreed to share their observations with us on their industry, where many behaviors once considered normal, banal, even funny, are no longer so today.  

Their voice returns. 

Charlotte Le Bon

Filmmaker and actress< /p>

#MeToo 5&nbsp ;years later seen by the artists

Photo: Denis Germain/Métro

There is still a lot of work to do. I dare to hope that this is only the beginning. I believe that there are many people who should have fallen who are still there.

Charlotte Le Bon

“At the same time, we live in such a violent society that I understand all the victims who do not want to talk. There's so much victim bashing, I understand that they want to stay in the shadows. I like the idea that predators live in a bit of fear. It really pleases me a lot that those who haven't fallen are sleeping a little worse, that they feel a Damocles sword over their heads. »  

< strong>Véronique Cloutier 

Animator

#MeToo 5 years later seen by artists

Photo: Josie Desmarais/Metro

“There really was an awareness. Now, there are things that no longer pass on the sets and which passed before under the sign of fun. I know that a lot of production companies have harassment policies for employees, technicians, everyone to sign. That's really the word, an awareness, and that's good. There are things that should no longer happen today.

Sara Montpetit

Comedienne

#MeToo 5 years later as seen by artists

Photo: Denis Germain/Metro

I hear a lot of actress friends who have really awful experiences on film sets due to mishandled intimacy scenes.

Sara Montpetit

“We are asked things and we have to say yes, otherwise we go for the actress who cries, who becomes a burden for the team, who has to drive fast. It's super difficult, these scenes. The UDA [Union des artistes] needs to establish advice regarding intimate scenes. We want experienced intimacy coordinators. They hire them now, but they are not experienced. It still gives scenes of intimacy made clumsily today. It breaks the confidence of the actresses. I hear stories of girls who have trauma.”  

Sarah-Maude Beauchesne 

Author, screenwriter and actress

#MeToo 5 years later as seen by artists

Photo: Josie Desmarais/Métro

“Concrete and real means are taken concerning, for example, the scenes of intimacy with the coordinators. We talk about these scenes, we take care of them, we communicate more when they are delicate. We take more care of the actors and actresses. The role of intimacy coordinator solidifies these promises to change things. There are more and more of them on film sets. It is so important that we take the time to talk about these scenes, to analyze them, to create an atmosphere of security. This is a new priority that should have been one forever. Make film sets safe spaces. We do not take these scenes lightly. Traumas, personal experiences can be mixed in with this, and this should not be overlooked. » 

Mariana Mazza

< strong>Comedian, actress, author, painter

#MeToo 5 ans later vu par the artists

Photo: Josie Desmarais/Métro

A lot of beauty has emerged, in short, justice has emerged, but it lacks a balance.

Mariana Mazza

“Our duty is to listen to the victims – I don’t like that word, I prefer to talk about people who have suffered things –, give them a voice and help them. But, in my opinion, there should be a scale of gradation of the acts committed. There is a slightly more concrete analysis of certain gestures to be made: if a guy has been an asshole, he is not a rapist. We are in a movement for justice, but we have to be careful about the lives we are destroying: those of the victims – and we have to do our work in relation to them –, but also those of people involved in certain things and who do not always deserve this fate. But it is up to those who have experienced pain to make this scale; I'm just an observer whose opinions don't have the same value as those girls or those guys. » 

Evelyne de la Chenelière

Playwright and actress

#MeToo 5 years later seen by artists

Photo: Julie Artacho

“I see today a kind of agreement being sealed for a sharing of responsibilities which ensures that everyone knows that there will henceforth be no place for abuse and that if someone suffers from it, it will not only be the responsibility of the victim to set his limits or to denounce an aggressor; it will be the responsibility of the whole team to pay attention and talk about it. Before, each case was by definition personal; now, I have the feeling that each case, personal as it is, is automatically collective. There is really a break in solitude which marks a point of no return. I'm not saying that it won't happen again - I'm not a jovialist, that's not the question –, but a page of history has been written which means that there will no longer be such isolation. when you suffer something. »  

Emma Beko

Rapper

#MeToo 5 ans later vu par the artists

Photo: Courtesy Socpens

” I never tolerated a guy saying or doing anything that made me uncomfortable, but maybe now I I have more confidence, I feel more entitled to express how I feel about it. Even with the MeToo movement, some have not understood. I have much less patience. I assume that you should know better. I expect better from everyone. Even for an inappropriate comment, no more polite laughter, you will be called out. What happened with Safia [Nolin] and Maripier [Morin] also made me think. I never thought a woman could be out of place or make me feel uncomfortable, but they can too. »  

Rosie Valland

Author-composer-performer and director

#MeToo 5 ans later vu par the artists

Photo: Gaëlle Leroyer

As a woman, before the movement, I took for granted a lot of microaggressions, if only the feeling of not being taken as seriously as my colleagues in my profession. It was just the price to pay.

Rosie Valland

“ The testimonies that I read allowed me to name things that I experienced or noticed around me. There was an awareness among men, they had no choice. It led to some great discussions in the vans. There is a new sensibility. On the side of women in technical roles, there is work to be done. As a director, I work with a lot of young women who have had bad experiences with directors. I make it my duty to deconstruct that, to put them back at the center of their project, to restore their confidence. Many women consider that their success is not due to them. »  

Steve Gagnon

Playwright and actor< /strong>

 #MeToo 5 years later as seen by artists

Photo: Josie Desmarais/Métro

With the first wave, we saw extreme criminal acts. With the second, we have seen that the spectrum that contributes to the culture of rape, aggression and harassment is broad. Everyone felt concerned.

Steve Gagnon

“I've heard people say: 'Yes, but we've all done that before', like doing a trick to end up at a girl's house. Inappropriate, misogynistic comments that objectify women have greatly diminished around me, as a man. Now, as soon as there is a comment of the kind, there is great discomfort, the person recovers. It changes a lot, a lot. It creates healthier, more respectful environments. During the intimate scenes on the sets, people quickly offer to do a close set or withdraw –  we saw little of this attention before. It was a blow in the middle of the cinema and the television. But that's just my point of view as a man, I know the problem is bigger and not solved. »  

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