Public sector: Québec proposes increases of 7 % over five years

Secteur public: Québec propose des hausses de 7 % sur cinq ans

These are “offers very, very reasonable”, corresponding to the “capacity to pay of Québec”, was suggested by the president of the Treasury Board, Christian Dubé. It has to be recalled that each percentage point of wage increase will cost $ 400 million to the public Treasury.

12 December 2019 14: 30

Updated at 20h43

Share

Public sector: Québec proposes increases of 7 % over five years

Patrice Bergeron

The Canadian Press

Share

The government Legault provides for wage increases of 7 % over five years, the whole of the public sector — a proposal less than the inflation —, but it leaves the prospect of further gains for the privileged few.

However, in September, the prime minister François Legault had said that the State workers were going to have to be satisfied with increases corresponding to inflation and that there was more fiscal leeway.

But this is only the beginning in the negotiations and there is still margin of manoeuvre, has hinted the president of the Treasury Board, Christian Dubé, Thursday, at a press conference in the parliament at Quebec.

The basic package over five years for the 550, 000 employees of the State breaks down as follows : 1.75 per cent each year for two years, until 2021-2022, 1.5% for 2022-2023, and 1 % per year for the following two years, until 2024-2025, therefore, for a total of 7 %.

A bonus of $ 1,000 is provided for the employees at the higher end of the scale, while sector-specific measures are foreseen for the groups that are considered priorities by the government, or the orderlies and teachers.

Including bonus offers for these groups, the increases will be 2% per year over three years, and 1.5% per year for the following two years, for a total of nine percent. However, the inflation rate is expected to be 2.2 % in 2019 and in 2020.

These are “offers very, very reasonable”, corresponding to the “capacity to pay of Québec”, was suggested by Mr. Dubé. He also pointed out that each percentage point of wage increase will cost $ 400 million to the public Treasury.

“We will not tell you the figure, there is still room for maneuver, to be able to go to achieve, precisely, the election commitments we made, in education and health”, he continued.

Unions outraged

The trade unions reject unanimously these offers. Even if the plants are not grouped together in a common front for the negotiations, they are substantially all the same language.

The public service unions, professionals of the government, of nurses, professionals and health technicians, teachers, the CSN and the FTQ, which represents several hundreds of thousands of employees of the State, rebel against the will of the government Legault grant them wage increases below inflation.

All invoke the major surpluses recorded by the government following years of cuts to which their members have made the costs in order to claim their share of the loot, while recalling the Institut de la statistique du Québec reported a delay in salary for 13.2% of the staff of the State compared to the other employees in quebec.

The government also creates three forums where funding enhancements to the offer will be on the table, is there shown. The three forums will be respectively devoted to the educational success, access to care, as well as the overall health of the employees.

Thus, the improvement of the remuneration of the orderlies “is likely to be sufficient to attract and retain the employees, said the minister of Health, Danielle McCann, at the side of the president of the Treasury Board.

Similarly, the reduction of salary steps in the teaching — another commitment of the CAQ — could be addressed, was suggested by the minister of Education, Jean-François Roberge.

Québec also intends to address among others the problem of absenteeism in the workplace.

The forums will be able to discuss compensation, it is new, argues the government. “[Mr. Dubé] undermines the pillars of the temple, we innovate,” said Mr. Roberge.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *