QuadrigaCX: customers want to know if the founder is really dead

QuadrigaCX: les clients veulent savoir si le fondateur est vraiment mort

Counsel to clients of QuadrigaCX request the commercial crime Program of the RCMP to conduct an autopsy on the body of Gerald Cotten to confirm her identity and cause of death.

December 14, 2019 15h53

Updated at 16h23

Share

QuadrigaCX: customers want to know if the founder is really dead

The canadian Press

Share

HALIFAX — lawyers for customers who have lost millions of dollars in the bankruptcy of the exchange platform cryptomonnaie QuadrigaCX have formally asked the RCMP to exhume the remains of the founder of the firm.

In a letter published Friday on its website, the law firm Miller Thomson LLP of Toronto request the commercial crime Program of the RCMP to conduct an autopsy on the body of Gerald Cotten to confirm her identity and cause of death.

The letter indicates that it is important to know if “Mr. Cotten is truly dead”. The cabinet asks that the exhumation process will be completed by the spring of 2020.

Cotten, who ran the company from his home outside of Halifax, died suddenly in December 2018 while traveling in India. As ceo of QuadrigaCX and sole director, he was the only one to have access to the portfolios cold supposed to contain the cryptomonnaie of its customers.

More than 76 000 unsecured creditors, almost all customers QuadrigaCX, have come forward to claim 214,6 million $ — 74.1 million $ in cash and 140,5 million or $ cryptomonnaie.

The request for exhumation was considerably hurt to the widow of Mr. Cotten, Jennifer Robertson, said his lawyer, Richard Niedemayer in a statement sent by e-mail.

“Gerry passed away on December 9, 2018 in India, one can read in the statement. It is not known how the exhumation or an autopsy to confirm the cause of the death of Gerry a result of complications resulting from Crohn’s disease could further assist the process of recovery of the assets.”

In a settlement announced in October, Ms. Robertson and the estate of Mr. Cotten had agreed to return approximately $ 12 million of assets to help pay down the users of the platform. Among these assets included properties in Nova Scotia and British Columbia, a small airplane, “luxury vehicles, a yacht, investment and money, as well as pieces of gold and silver.

The bankruptcy trustee Ernst and Young was discovered during a survey that the company had falsified the financial reports and that large volumes of cryptomonnaies had been transferred to personal accounts controlled by Mr. Cotten.

In a statement issued at the time of the settlement, Ms. Robertson stated that she was not aware of the way her husband operated the company nor its use of the funds of the users.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *